© 2019 by Bat Cave Designs

RARE Wild Ginseng Root aka ‘She Root’ featured in MNN.com article!

 

This is a truly rare wild american ginseng root! The amazing ‘she root’, aka ‘The Madonna’ (the historical one, not the other……) is special because she looks like a mother & child embracing. ‘Man Roots’ are very rare & valuable in the ginseng world, and this one even more so because of the obvious feminine character.


This dry root weighs 9 grams, and has 8+ neck scars. Also available in a display case.

 

Visit her ETSY listing here!

 

This root was featured in a news article by MNN.com. Check out the article here! This turned out to be a really nice article from Laura Moss @ MNN.com….. Martin & I are glad to have contributed. We think the whole story does a good job representing the position we take when it comes to stewardship, poaching & value of ginseng. Our “She Root” was featured as an example of one of the most valued types of ginseng root, the scarce & sought after ‘Man Root’.

 

Ginseng demand boosts prices and poaching

 

Selection from the article by LAURA MOSS:

 

“Ginseng buyers in Asia pay a premium for certain types of roots. Those known as “man roots” — ones with a human shape and what appear to be body parts — can go for thousands of dollars. Currently, one of Jackson’s man roots (pictured right) is listed for sale on Etsy for $7,000.

 

“The price of ginseng varies from year to year, but the one constant is the demand for wild ginseng roots with potency and character,” she said. “This particular ginseng root is a remarkable example of a ‘man root,’ [which] is quite rare and sought after in the ginseng world.

 

“An ancient concept called the ‘Doctrine of Signatures’ theorizes that ‘herbs that resemble parts of the body can heal or cure those particular body parts.’ A ginseng root with such a resemblance to mankind makes it very sought after for its highly regarded tonic and curative properties.”

 

Jackson points out that because this particular root has a feminine character and resembles a woman cradling a child, it’s particularly precious, especially since ginseng is often used as a fertility aid.

 

However, Jackson’s ginseng may also be considered valuable because of where it comes from. Some of the most sought-after ginseng is harvested from the hills of the eastern U.S., primarily from North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky and West Virginia, where ginseng hunters can find older, more valuable roots. Ginseng from these areas can sell for a few hundred dollars in summer, but by fall when the growing season comes to an end, those prices tend to rise above $1,000.”

 

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